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The GMAT Scoring Scale

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The Score Report

An official GMAT score report consists of five parts:

  • Verbal Scaled Score (on a scale from 0 to 60)
  • Quantitative Scaled Score (on a scale from 0 to 60)
  • Total Scaled Score (on a scale from 200 to 800)
  • Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) Score (on a scale from 0 to 6)
  • Integrated Reasoning Score (on a scale from 1 to 8)

The total score is a scaled combination of the verbal and quantitative scaled scores, and thus reflects a student’s overall performance on the multiple-choice sections of the test. The AWA and the Integrated Reasoning sections are scored independently; scores for these sections do not affect the 200-800 scaled score.


The Verbal and Quantitative Sections

To compute the scaled score for the Verbal and Quantitative sections, GMAT uses an algorithm that takes the following factors into account:

  • the number of questions answered within the time permitted
  • the number of questions answered correctly
  • the statistical characteristics (including level of difficulty) of the questions answered

At the beginning of each section, the GMAT presents a question in the middle range of difficulty. If the question is answered correctly, the next question will be harder and the test-taker's score will adjust upwards. If the question is answered incorrectly, the next question will be easier, and the test-taker’s score will adjust downwards. (The test taker does not see this adjustment because the score is not revealed until the entire test has been completed.) Thus, the algorithm is constantly recalculating the scaled score as the student progresses through the section.

As a test-taker answers more questions, the algorithm receives more information about his or her skills and is able to calculate an accurate score with greater and greater precision. Consequently, the questions at the beginning of the section are weighted much more heavily than questions near the end of the section. For example, by the time Question 36 appears, the computer has had 35 questions from which to derive the proper score range. So even if Question 36 were answered correctly, the increase in score would be minimal compared to the increase in score if Question 2 had been answered correctly.

Upon completing the GMAT, test-takers must decide whether or not to keep their scores. Those who choose to keep their scores are able to view the total scaled score along with the separate Verbal and Quantitative scaled scores. Those who choose to cancel cannot view any scores.

The real value of a GMAT score is determined by its percentile ranking. A percentile ranking indicates the percentage of test-takers who scored at or below a particular score: the higher the percentile ranking, the more competitive the score. Percentile rankings in the charts below reflect the most current data from the GMAC (through July 2015).

The following table shows the 61 possible GMAT total scaled scores and the percentile rankings assigned to each.

Scaled Score Percentile Scaled Score Percentile
760-800 99 530 37
750 98 520 35
740 97 510 33
730 96 500 30
720 94 490 28
710 91 480 26
700 89 470 24
690 86 460 21
680 84 450 19
670 82 440 17
660 79 430 16
650 76 420 14
640 71 410 13
630 70 400 12
620 66 390 11
610 63 380 9
600 60 360-370 8
590 56 340-350 6
580 53 320-330 5
570 50 310 4
560 47 280-300 3
550 44 250-270 2
540 41 220-240 1
200-210 0

While total scaled scores range from 200 to 800, approximately half of all test takers score between 400 and 600.

The verbal and quantitative scaled scores are also assigned percentile rankings. The following table shows the possible verbal and quantitative scaled scores and the percentile rankings assigned to each.

Verbal Quantitative
Scaled Score Percentile Scaled Score Percentile
45-51 99 51-60 97
44 98 50 87
42 96 49 78
41 94 48 73
40 91 47 67
39 89 46 64
38 85 45 62
37 83 44 57
36 80 43 55
35 76 42 50
34 71 41 48
33 68 40 46
32 66 39 42
31 61 38 40
30 58 37 38
29 56 36 35
28 50 35 32
27 45 34 30
26 43 33 29
25 38 32 26
24 36 31 23
23 31 30 22
22 29 29 19
21 26 28 18
20 22 27 16
19 19 26 14
18 17 25 12
17 14 24 11
16 12 23 10
15 10 22 9
14 9 21 8
13 7 19-20 7
12 5 18 6
11 4 17 5
10 3 14-16 4
9 2 13 3
7-8 1 10-12 2
0-6 0 7-9 1
0-6 0


The Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA)

The AWA essay receives two scores on a scale of 0 to 6, at least one of which comes from a human reader. The other score, however, may come from a computerized evaluation program. If the scores from the two readers are identical or differ by exactly one point, they are averaged to obtain the final score for that essay. If the scores differ by more than one point, an expert human reader determines the final score.

The following table lists all of the possible AWA scaled scores and the percentile rankings assigned to each of them.

AWA Score Percentile
6 92
5.5 81
5 60
4.5 44
4 21
3.5 13
3 6
2.5 5
0.5-2.0 3
0 0

Over 90% of test-takers receive a scaled score of 3 or higher on the AWA. Since human readers are involved in the AWA grading process, students cannot view their AWA scores on the same day that they take the test. Students who choose to keep their scores receive an official GMAT score report via regular mail approximately two weeks later that includes their AWA score.


Integrated Reasoning

The Integrated Reasoning section is scored on a scale of 1 to 8, in one-point increments. This section is not computer adaptive.

Test-takers will not be able to view their Integrated Reasoning scores on the same day that they take the test. Those who choose to keep their scores will receive an official GMAT score report via regular mail approximately two weeks later that includes the Integrated Reasoning score.

Score Percentile
8 92
7 81
6 67
5 53
4 38
3 25
2 12
1 0